Press Release

KORUS HOUSE, EMBASSY OF THE REPUBLIC OF KOREA
Contact
Adam Wojciechowicz
(202) 587-6168
AWOJ@koreaembassy.org
www.Dynamic-Korea.com

PR_image_DFT

Desirable Fairy Tales: Between Fantasy and Reality

An exhibition of visual, installation, performance, and video art about how life is not always what it once seemed…

Opening Reception Event
Wednesday, March 10, 2010, 6–8 pm

Exhibition Dates
March 10 – 25, 2010
M-F: 9 am – 12pm, 2–5:30 pm

Location
KORUS House
2370 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington DC 20008

Free & Open to the Public
RSVP Required

Organized by Project Andini

(Washington, DC – March 1, 2010): KORUS House and Project Andini are pleased to
announce Desirable Fairy Tales: Between Fantasy and Reality, a group exhibition featuring
four contemporary artists with different cultural and aesthetic backgrounds: Mina Cheon,
Hye Rim Lee, Gilbert Trent, and Satomi Shirai. As the first art exhibition program organized
by Project Andini, an art collective founded in March 2009, this exhibition includes visual,
installation, and video art that explores how identity as an adult is often more complex and
diverse than the roles and self-images prescribed in childhood. The opening reception will
also feature experiential performance artists from banished? productions, an exhibit of Mina
Cheon’s book Shamanism + Cyberspace, an outdoor video projection of Hye Rim Lee’s Lash,
and exhibition tours by the artists and guest curator, Jeong-ok Jeon.

Desirable Fairy Tales attempts to expose the absurdity of limiting socially-accepted behaviors
and the notion that everyone should aspire to the same personal ideal, perceptions which
are often rooted in childhood play experiences. Based on their different personal
experiences and nationalities, the featured artists’ works share a theme of typical girl’s toys,
such as the Westernized paper dolls once popular in Korea, life-like doll houses, and the
ageless, unobtainably “perfect” Barbie doll. This exhibition encourages audiences to see the
disconnect between fantasy and reality in the childhood world, and to challenge sociallyinvented
set formulas and concepts of identity. For more information and images, visit
www.Dynamic-Korea.com or www.projectandini.org.

NOTE: This exhibition features some artwork with mature, adult themes; audience discretion
is advised. The exhibition will be on display at KORUS House March 10 – 25, 2010 (building
hours are Mon-Fri, 9 am – 12 pm and 2 – 5:30 pm). An RSVP is only required for the opening
reception.

Opening Reception RSVP
An RSVP is required to attend the March 10 event. To RSVP online, please go to
www.Dynamic-Korea.com and click on the announcement article for this event. You can also
RSVP by email or phone to awoj@koreaembassy.org or (202) 587-6168; please remember to
include your name, a contact point, and your total number of guests.

About The Artists and Their Work
Korean American artist Mina Cheon (PhD, MFA), is a new media artist, writer, and educator
who divides her time between Baltimore, New York, and Seoul. Her contribution to the
exhibition includes oversized South Korean paper dolls of the 1970s that reveal the influence
of Western ideals, especially in the way Korean girls came to idealize the American life style.
Cheon’s work also includes dolls in North Korean military garb that collectively illustrate the
loss of individuality. She is currently a full-time professor at the Maryland Institute College of
Art (MICA) in Baltimore teaching studio and liberal arts. As an artist, she has shown her
works internationally, including solo exhibitions at the Lance Fung Gallery in New York, Insa
Art Space in Seoul, and C. Grimaldis Gallery in Baltimore. More at www.minacheon.com.

Korean American multi-media artist Hye Rim Lee, based in Seoul, New York, and Auckland,
has shown her digital animation and performance works in solo and group exhibitions, art
fairs, and film screenings. Her contributions to the exhibition, two short animations, focus on
popular culture, particularly cyber culture and notions of femininity in video games. Lee has
participated in several artist-in-residency programs such as ISCP in New York and SSamzie
Space in Seoul. She has a BFA in Intermedia from The University of Auckland, and a degree in
Voice from Ewha Womans University. More at www.hyerimlee.com.

Inspired by a Buddhist philosophy of human existence, American Gilbert Trent, an African
American, gay artist, explores issues of race, sex, and gender through representational
images of paper dolls. His contribution to the exhibition also includes an installation as an
extended media that reflects the perplexity between a boy’s feminine desire and reality.
Trent received a BS in Fine Arts Education from Virginia State University and MA in Studio Art
from New York University’s Venice Program. He currently teaches studio and digital art in
the private sector and participates in a studio program at Arlington Art Center in Arlington,
Va. More at www.gilberttrent.com.

Japanese American artist Satomi Shirai is interested in the assimilation and transformation
of culture as a result of migration and time. Her contribution to the exhibition, interiors
photographs of detailed miniature homes staged with plastic toys from doll house kits,
portray Western architecture and Japanese domestic life; the blurring of reality and fantasy
is meant to illustrate the delusion of an ideal lifestyle. Her work has been shown worldwide,
including at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, the Arlington Art Center in Arlington,
Va., the National Portrait Gallery in London, and at Motus Fort in Japan. She has participated
in the Akiyoshidai International Art Village in Yamaguchi and her work is included in the
collection of the Kiyosato Museum of Photography Art in Yamanashi. She is currently an MFA
candidate at City University of New York, Hunter College. More at www.satomishirai.com.

Banished? productions is an avant-pop performance company that generates immersive
interdisciplinary art experiences and is committed to producing quality work from multiple
artistic expressions, particularly in performance experiments that play with text and form.
More at www.banishedproductions.org.

KORUS House is the Korean Culture & Information Service at the Embassy of the Republic
of Korea in Washington D.C. Its mission is to act as a bridge between the people of Korea
and the United States through cultural events, organizational partnerships, educational
programs, providing information, and online media at www.Dynamic-Korea.com.